Are Windows with Tilt-in Sashes Better Than Those Without?

Are Windows with Tilt-in Sashes Better Than Those Without?

A window sash is the part of a window that holds the glass unit. How the sash moves depends on the style of the window. Some sash move up and down, side-to-side, and others operate on a hinge instead of a track. Some windows have what are called tilt sashes or tilt-in sashes. We'll focus on those in this post. 

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What is a tilt sash window?

A tilt sash window is a window that has a one or two sash that unlatch from the window jamb allowing a person to tilt the sash toward them in the interior of the home. The sash unlatches from the top corners and remains locked in at the bottom corners so it is still being held within the window. The tilt-sash is designed to make cleaning window glass easier from the interior of the home. 

To open a tilt sash all you need to do is raise the lower sash about four inches up and then slide the tilt latches on either side inwards, slowly tilt the window toward you while easing its top edge. Use caution when tilting the sash, there is no pressure holding the sash in position so if you let go of it, gravity will take over and drop the sash. 

If you want to remove the window sash, just tilt it until it takes a horizontal position and pop the window out of the shoes at the bottom of the sash.

What type of windows have tilt-in sashes?

Tilt-sashes are offered on single-hung and double-hung windows. These styles have sash that operate vertically to provide ventilation. Depending on the style one or both sash will be able to move and tilt. 

Single-Hung Windows

Single-hung windows have a fixed top sash and operable lower sash. If the window is equipped with a tilt-sash it will be the lower sash, the operable sash, that has the tilt function. Unfortunately, that means the top sash still needs to be cleaned from the exterior and is one reason why double-hung windows with tilt-sashes are more attractive to homeowners. 

Double-Hung Windows

Double-hung windows look just like single-hung windows, the difference is both the top sash and bottom sash are operable. The benefit of having two operable sashes is that the homeowner has more control over ventilation. When both sashes are open, air can enter through the bottom sash and exit through the top. 

Tilting capability in double-hung sashes offer the most convenience, especially for homeowners with multi-level homes. The ability to tilt both sashes in from the interior of the house makes cleaning the glass on the windows convenient and safer than attempting to clean them from the outside. 

Double-hung windows can be more expensive than single-hung windows but they offer more value. To save on costs, homeowners often choose single-hung windows for the first floor and double-hung windows for upper levels. 

Are windows with tilt-in sashes better than those without?

Yes, in terms of function windows with the tilt-in sash option are better than those without. That doesn't mean windows without tilt-sash capability are a bad choice, if the window you're looking at doesn't have a tilt-sash that's OK. If you're deciding between windows with or without tilt-sashes then get a few bids. After you have real estimates in front of you ask yourself if you want more or less function from your windows and if the price difference is worth it.

Should I choose windows with or without a tilt sash?

We recommend windows with the tilt-sash. Below is a short list of windows we know have tilt-sashes. This is a common feature, if you don't have a window retailer near you that offers the windows listed below you should still have plenty of other options. Happy window shopping!

Brennan Traditions Single Hung Windows

Brennan Signature Single Hung Windows

Brennan Solar Bear Single Hung Windows

NT Presidential Single Hung and Double Hung Windows

NT Executive Single Hung Windows

MI 1620 Single Hung Windows

MI 3500 Single Hung Windows

MI 3540 Single Hung Windows

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     -Bobby

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