Tips for washing dirty windows | Brennan

Tips for washing dirty windows

It’s getting hot in Texas and now you can choose which kind of summer person you want to be. Are you going to be the person who basks in the rays of the sun while sitting by the pool or the person who prefers to witness the growth in the garden from inside? 

As much as I like to be outside, once we hit that 90-plus degree heat I become the kind of person that prefers to enjoy the summer from inside my home. I head over to that spot on my window seat where I can still feel the sun hit my face while I also enjoy the cool breeze from my AC.

Luckily for me I always have a clear view of the garden because our windows are pretty spotless, even though window cleaning is only recommended 1 to 2 times a year, ours are cleaned fairly often (well those are anyway). Having clean windows means I can really enjoy the beauty the sun brings to our garden as the bunnies nibble on the grass and the bees buzz around the flowers.

If you’re trying to enjoy your summer from inside your home like me, here 6 tips on how to clean your windows that we learned from Angie's List.

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6 tips to help you clean your windows

1: Watch the weather!

Do you know that feeling you get when you take your car through the car wash one more morning only to have it rain later that day? It’s horrible! OK but you’re windows get rained on all the time right? Imagine being in the middle of washing your windows when it starts to rain, now that would definitely affect my mood for the day.

But SERIOUSLY watch the weather and schedule your window-cleaning project for an overcast day or at a time when the heat of the sun won’t negatively impact your process. The heat of the sun can cause the liquid cleaner to dry too quickly which can cause streaking.

2: Dry-clean your windows

Dry-clean your windows? That just means you’ll want to clean the surface of the window with a dry soft-bristle brush or a dust cloth. Tackle the cobwebs, dust, and dirt before getting the windows wet.

3: Mix your own cleaner

Prepare a gentle liquid cleaning solution to use on the window panes only: mix one part white vinegar and one part hot water. Side note: Some people also add dish detergent to the solution or swap the dish detergent for the vinegar instead.

4: Tackling the dirt

Using a sponge or lint-free cloth, wet the window glass and rub away the dirt. Avoid drenching the windows and try to keep the vinegar solution from coming in contact with the window frame. This is especially important if the window is made from wood as wood windows are susceptible to rot.

5: Squeegee hints

If you’re using a squeegee (pro-tip: you should.) start by wetting the blade so it doesn’t skip. Start at an upper corner:

  • Take a cloth wrapped around your finger and wipe around the edge of the window so the squeegee has a small dry area to grab on to
  • Draw the squeegee in a straight stroke (pro-tip: go in the direction that will have the least amount of strokes)
  • Wipe the blade with a lint-free cloth
  • Repeat until you wipe the entire window

6: The final step

Clean the window frames by wiping them down with a damp cloth and immediately rinsing with a lean, dry cloth. Use only non-ammoniated all-purpose cleaner or water for the window frames.

Looking for more? If you're a visual learner here's a quick video from This Old House on how to wash windows like a pro.

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Taking the time to clean your windows is also valuable because it allows you to spot any damage. You might find that your windows need repairs or that you might benefit from replacement windows.

If these tips were helpful or you’ve got other questions for us feel free to reach out to us on social media, we’re happy to help.

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